It’s September again »

Stephen Hackett:

It’s a month that is of vital importance to my family. As some of you may know, our oldest son was diagnosed in May 2009 with a malignant brain tumor. In the blink of an eye, we went from a young family with a seemingly-healthy six month old baby to a young family facing the reality that our son was gravely sick.

Today, that baby is in second grade. As I write this, he’s eating dinner with his two younger siblings. They just spent an afternoon running around the yard together.

That may just sound like another September afternoon to you, but to me, it’s nothing short of a miracle.

There are few things as important as helping support families of children with cancer. I tear up every year that Stephen posts this. This year is no different. Then I donate. You should too, if you’re able.

When Does a Fringe Movement Stop Being Fringe? »

Vann Newkirk II, at The Atlantic:

The disconnect in terms is understandable. It’s one thing to see the Red Shirts and Klansmen as bogeymen of the past and imagine their pogroms and mob clashes in the abstract. It’s another to see them manifest suddenly in violent strength, even if one subscribes to the idea that white supremacy runs deeper than caricatures of hooded rogues, and that its long tendrils have always animated politics and political violence in America.

Even for me, as my father has studied the violence of white supremacy for most of my life, it’s hard to square a group of men with Home Depot tiki torches, wrinkled khakis, bad haircuts, and a love of memes who came down to Emancipation Park with the blood-curdling menace of Klansmen in my mind’s eye. It’s easier to joke about losers camping out in a park than to consider them capable of the kinds of paradigm-shifting horror that destroyed countless black families.

But that’s a trick of historical perspective—even the most feared white supremacists in the lore of Jim Crow were just regular white men, transformed from lives as politicians, mechanics, farmers, and layabouts by the sheer power of ideology. And often, their movements were considered “fringe” and marginal—until they weren’t.

Coda 2.0 for iOS is here »

From the Panic site:

We’ve put an stunning, desktop-class amount of work into Coda for iOS. It’s truly pro. But, it’s not hard to learn. You’re getting an incredible amount of power at a killer price. Buy it today! And let us know what you make with it!

Yeah. Just buy it. And yes, this post was created in/posted from Coda for iOS. Crazy awesome stuff.

Remembering Martin Luther King »

That’s my momma.

Due 2 arrives »

Federico Viticci on Due 2:

The way Lin Junjie decided to release Due 2 is also worth a mention. Due 2 is a free update that replaces the old Due app on the App Store, bringing a new UI and the features mentioned above. For new customers, the app will be $4.99 as usual. For old customers only, four features will be locked with a $2.99 In-App Purchase: background sync, 45 new tones, auto snooze options, and the ability to pause timers. This is, effectively, a way to implement upgrade pricing on the App Store for an existing SKU – new customers won’t see the IAP and old owners of the app will automatically be brought into the new Due app with an option to pay for new functionality.

Interesting model, and I’m happy that Junjie was able to figure out a way to charge for an discounted upgrade. It’s a hack, but it works.

TapCellar—a power user's beer app »

My buddies, Gabe and Jeff, have a new app out for beer nerds and it’s a power user’s (drinker’s?) tool for sure. You can basically keep track of everything related to the beers you love—or hate, for that matter. Seriously, everything. And it’s only $4.99. Also, if you haven’t already, you should be listening to their new podcast. Great guys, making great stuff.

Six Colors reviews the new iMac »

Jason Snell, at Six Colors:

I’ve been in the market for a desktop Mac for a few months. I began considering the Mac Pro, but the $3000 entry price seemed like overkill. Then I looked at the Mac mini, specifically the quad-core models, but they were outdated—and the newly updated Mac minis only offer dual-core processors. Then along comes the Retina iMac, and even though I’ve got a perfectly nice 24-inch display on my desk, I’m sorely tempted to join the Retina party.

This is the promise of the 27-inch iMac with Retina 5K Display: It’s one of the fastest Macs ever attached to the best Mac display ever. Yes, it’s an iMac, meaning you can’t attach a newer, faster computer to this thing in two or three years. But I have a feeling that these iMacs will have the processor power, and the staying power, to make the aging process much less painful.

My Mac and iPhone setup »

My buddy Chris Gonzales was nice enough to interview me about my setup over at The Sweet Setup. It’s a site I read all the time, so I was excited when asked to share. Check it out.

Drafts 4 »

Alex Guyot, writing for MacStories:

This is Drafts though, an app that has been at the forefront of iOS automation since the field began. I should not have been worried. Released today on the App Store as a new, iOS 8-only, and Universal app, Drafts 4 is an evolution which boasts a huge number of improvements and represents a much needed shift in direction. With a UI refresh, a smarter and more accessible interface for building actions, a fantastic Share extension, a customizable extended keyboard, an enhanced URL scheme, and the intriguing introduction of JavaScript scripts for text manipulation, Drafts 4 is Agile Tortoise’s statement that they are ready for the challenges of a modern iOS.

Greg Pierce knocked it out of the park with Drafts 4. It’s an incredibly powerful tool, and even after using it for a couple of months, I’m still discovering things that make the app even better. You should absolutely pick it up.

Transmit for iOS is coming »

Federico Viticci, at MacStories:

Inside the app, users will be able to create favorite servers (for FTP, SFTP, WebDAV, and S3 connections like in Transmit for Mac), tweak advanced settings, upload local files to configured servers with drag & drop, and secure the app with Touch ID. The latter has been particularly handy in my tests, as it allowed me to put up a layer of security that, however, doesn’t require me to type a long password every time.

I’m so happy. So, so happy.