Manual for iPhone »

iOS 8 introduced a bunch of new APIs for manual control over the camera, and the aptly named Manual, looks to be nice new camera app with loads of those controls built in. I’ll definitely be checking it out. It’s available now on the App Store.

iOS 8: The Pixel Envy Review »

Nick Heer:

It is for this reason that I will be writing a review of iOS 8 in two parts. The first part, which is what you’re reading now, is a review of the first-party aspects of iOS. It is truly a review of iOS 8, not apps built for iOS 8. The second part, which will be released in weeks-to-months, is a review of what is possible when third-party developers get ahold of the thousands of new APIs available to them.

This is what I have gleaned from using iOS 8 every day since June 2 on my primary (and only) iPhone 5S and my Retina iPad Mini.

Just finished reading Nick’s epic—and wonderfully detailed review. Buckle up and enjoy.

Transmit for iOS is coming »

Federico Viticci, at MacStories:

Inside the app, users will be able to create favorite servers (for FTP, SFTP, WebDAV, and S3 connections like in Transmit for Mac), tweak advanced settings, upload local files to configured servers with drag & drop, and secure the app with Touch ID. The latter has been particularly handy in my tests, as it allowed me to put up a layer of security that, however, doesn’t require me to type a long password every time.

I’m so happy. So, so happy.

ATP 81 — You Left Your Money in a Bank »

I really enjoyed the post-show on this week’s ATP. They—specifically John—get a lot right in discussing anti-feminist gamers. Good stuff all around.


Henry Lee McCollum released from North Carolina prison »

Jonathan M. Katz, writing for The New York Times:

James and Priscilla McCollum, Henry’s father and stepmother, began to cry and shout for joy as the son they call Buddy stepped out in a houndstooth jacket, khaki pants and slate blue tie he’d been given by the lawyers who helped secure his release. The team, from the Center for Death Penalty Litigation, began weeping and hugging as well. Standing a free man in fresh air for the first time in his adult life, Mr. McCollum swatted away gnats as he faced a phalanx of television cameras. He told the reporters that his faith in God had sustained him through years of fear that the legal system that had wrongly incarcerated him would also wrongly take his life.

Mr. McCollum also spoke of the 152 men still on death row in the state prison, whom he called his family.

“You’ve still got innocent people on North Carolina death row,” he said. “Also you’ve got some guys who should not have gotten the death penalty. That’s wrong. You got to do something about those guys.”

[…]

Finally free, Mr. McCollum, who like Mr. Brown is mentally disabled (Mr. Brown’s IQ in tests has registered as low as 51) faces the challenge of his life: learning to live in a world he has not experienced since he was a teenager three decades ago. On death row, Mr. McCollum was never allowed to open a door, turn on the light switch, or use a zipper. He never had a cellphone, and until last week had not used the Internet. (He excitedly told his stepmother about his first use of Google Maps days ago, when he saw pictures of her house.)

Thirty one years, wrongfully incarcerated. I’ll assume Supreme Court Justice Scalia is eating a little crow today (probably not).

Keep Hope Alive »

I’m probably far complain-y when it comes to Things, but it’s my favorite task management solution and has been for years. But as we know, Cultured Code is… deliberate when it comes to updates.

They hit me with a tweet that’s got me excited. Best part is, this iOS 8 update is planned for version 2.5, and not version 3 which will obviously take longer. I’m keeping hope alive.

September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month »

Stephen Hackett:

I know first-hand what this means. In five years, my family hasn’t paid a single dime for our son’s care and on-going rehabilitation. As soul-crushing as having a child with cancer is, I can’t imagine having to worry about life-altering debt or filing for bankruptcy as well.

There are a million good causes out there, but let’s make September about those kids on my refrigerator.

I’ve set up a St. Jude fundraising page that I will be linking to instead of RSS sponsors for the month of September. My goal is to raise $1,000 for the kids of St. Jude this month It takes $2 million a day to run the hospital and research center, so $1,000 is a drop in the bucket. Let’s make it our drop.

Just made my donation. How could you not?

Pinner for iOS 8 »

Pinner is a very nice Pinboard client, and its developer Sam Oakley has been open about his plans for iOS 8. It’s shaping up to be extremely nice. Sam even has a new page detailing the upcoming version—which will be a free update.

Suffice it to say, new apps and updates made for iOS 8 are going to be killer. There are some other friends out there teasing as well. Can’t wait.

TextBundle—a new sandboxed Markdown spec »

From TextBundle, the brainchild of Brett Terpstra and The Soulmen:

The TextBundle file format aims to provide a more seamless user expericence when exchanging Markdown files between sandboxed applications.

Sandboxing is required for all apps available on the Mac and iOS app store, in order to grant users a high level of data security. Sandboxed apps are only permitted access to files explicitly provided by the user - for example Markdown text files. When working with different Markdown applications, sandboxing can cause inconveniences for the user.

An example: Markdown files may contain references to external images. When sending such a file from a Markdown editor to a previewer, users will have to explicitly permit access to every single image file.

This is where TextBundle comes in. TextBundle brings convenience back - by bundling the Markdown text and all referenced images into a single file. Supporting applications can just exchange TextBundles without asking for additional permissions. Beyond being a simple container, TextBundle includes a standard to transfer additional information - to open up new possibilites for future integration.

These guys are doing God’s work. You can read more about the spec here. This is exciting.

36 years in this skin »

Hacker wizard, Brett Terpstra:

I started drinking and smoking in Middle School. I wasn’t a popular kid, but I didn’t fit in with the burnouts, either. I was just a nerd with a proclivity for addiction and a need to snuff out my feelings. It was later determined that I was Bi-polar and ADD, among other things. I saw a shrink for depression and suicidal thoughts, but nothing came of it as far as treatment. Self-medication became a way of life. By High School I was always “on” something. By college I was a full-fledged addict.

This is an incredible, moving, introspective piece from Brett. Happy birthday, man. We’re all glad you made it.