Six Colors reviews the new iMac »

Jason Snell, at Six Colors:

I’ve been in the market for a desktop Mac for a few months. I began considering the Mac Pro, but the $3000 entry price seemed like overkill. Then I looked at the Mac mini, specifically the quad-core models, but they were outdated—and the newly updated Mac minis only offer dual-core processors. Then along comes the Retina iMac, and even though I’ve got a perfectly nice 24-inch display on my desk, I’m sorely tempted to join the Retina party.

This is the promise of the 27-inch iMac with Retina 5K Display: It’s one of the fastest Macs ever attached to the best Mac display ever. Yes, it’s an iMac, meaning you can’t attach a newer, faster computer to this thing in two or three years. But I have a feeling that these iMacs will have the processor power, and the staying power, to make the aging process much less painful.

Regarding Continuity on older Macs »

MacRumors Forums:

Created by Dokterdok (based on instructions compiled by UncleSchnitty) and available on Github, the Continuity Activation Tool is designed to activate Continuity by doing a compatibility check, creating backups of original System drivers, and disabling a Mac-model blacklist in the Bluetooth code that prevents Continuity from working on ineligible Macs. From there, it also whitelists Mac board-ids within the Wi-Fi code to get the feature working.

The tool can be downloaded as a zip file from Github and is installed by double clicking the app and following the instructions provided on the screen.

The Continuity Activation Tool will enable Continuity on the mid-2011 MacBook Air and the mid-2011 Mac mini with no additional hardware required, as both of those devices include Bluetooth 4.0. That means installing the tool should get Continuity up and running on those machines in just a few minutes.

I’m not sure I’m willing to take the risk, but we’ll see. I really want to be able to use AirDrop on my 2011 MacBook Air.

My Mac and iPhone setup »

My buddy Chris Gonzales was nice enough to interview me about my setup over at The Sweet Setup. It’s a site I read all the time, so I was excited when asked to share. Check it out.

Yosemite: Dark Dock and App Switcher with light menu bar »

Nice terminal hack from Rob Griffiths at Many Tricks. I like the look.

Drafts 4 »

Alex Guyot, writing for MacStories:

This is Drafts though, an app that has been at the forefront of iOS automation since the field began. I should not have been worried. Released today on the App Store as a new, iOS 8-only, and Universal app, Drafts 4 is an evolution which boasts a huge number of improvements and represents a much needed shift in direction. With a UI refresh, a smarter and more accessible interface for building actions, a fantastic Share extension, a customizable extended keyboard, an enhanced URL scheme, and the intriguing introduction of JavaScript scripts for text manipulation, Drafts 4 is Agile Tortoise’s statement that they are ready for the challenges of a modern iOS.

Greg Pierce knocked it out of the park with Drafts 4. It’s an incredibly powerful tool, and even after using it for a couple of months, I’m still discovering things that make the app even better. You should absolutely pick it up.

Manual for iPhone »

iOS 8 introduced a bunch of new APIs for manual control over the camera, and the aptly named Manual, looks to be nice new camera app with loads of those controls built in. I’ll definitely be checking it out. It’s available now on the App Store.

iOS 8: The Pixel Envy Review »

Nick Heer:

It is for this reason that I will be writing a review of iOS 8 in two parts. The first part, which is what you’re reading now, is a review of the first-party aspects of iOS. It is truly a review of iOS 8, not apps built for iOS 8. The second part, which will be released in weeks-to-months, is a review of what is possible when third-party developers get ahold of the thousands of new APIs available to them.

This is what I have gleaned from using iOS 8 every day since June 2 on my primary (and only) iPhone 5S and my Retina iPad Mini.

Just finished reading Nick’s epic—and wonderfully detailed review. Buckle up and enjoy.

Transmit for iOS is coming »

Federico Viticci, at MacStories:

Inside the app, users will be able to create favorite servers (for FTP, SFTP, WebDAV, and S3 connections like in Transmit for Mac), tweak advanced settings, upload local files to configured servers with drag & drop, and secure the app with Touch ID. The latter has been particularly handy in my tests, as it allowed me to put up a layer of security that, however, doesn’t require me to type a long password every time.

I’m so happy. So, so happy.

ATP 81 — You Left Your Money in a Bank »

I really enjoyed the post-show on this week’s ATP. They—specifically John—get a lot right in discussing anti-feminist gamers. Good stuff all around.


Henry Lee McCollum released from North Carolina prison »

Jonathan M. Katz, writing for The New York Times:

James and Priscilla McCollum, Henry’s father and stepmother, began to cry and shout for joy as the son they call Buddy stepped out in a houndstooth jacket, khaki pants and slate blue tie he’d been given by the lawyers who helped secure his release. The team, from the Center for Death Penalty Litigation, began weeping and hugging as well. Standing a free man in fresh air for the first time in his adult life, Mr. McCollum swatted away gnats as he faced a phalanx of television cameras. He told the reporters that his faith in God had sustained him through years of fear that the legal system that had wrongly incarcerated him would also wrongly take his life.

Mr. McCollum also spoke of the 152 men still on death row in the state prison, whom he called his family.

“You’ve still got innocent people on North Carolina death row,” he said. “Also you’ve got some guys who should not have gotten the death penalty. That’s wrong. You got to do something about those guys.”

[…]

Finally free, Mr. McCollum, who like Mr. Brown is mentally disabled (Mr. Brown’s IQ in tests has registered as low as 51) faces the challenge of his life: learning to live in a world he has not experienced since he was a teenager three decades ago. On death row, Mr. McCollum was never allowed to open a door, turn on the light switch, or use a zipper. He never had a cellphone, and until last week had not used the Internet. (He excitedly told his stepmother about his first use of Google Maps days ago, when he saw pictures of her house.)

Thirty one years, wrongfully incarcerated. I’ll assume Supreme Court Justice Scalia is eating a little crow today (probably not).